Chris' Recipes

Bon Appetite!

Brined Roasted Turkey

Written By: Chris - Apr• 09•13

Brining is the secret to juicy turkey!  (and a lot of other meats)  It’s very economical and an easy way to prepare meats.  Brining is like a marinade, as it keeps food moist and tender.  The process increases the moisture holding capacity of meat resulting in a much more moist product once it is cooked.  I started brining a few years ago after viewing so many different chefs doing so on the food network.  One of the great things about brining is that there are very few rules.  Most start with water and salt.    My favorite techniques come from Ann Burrell.  Add in some sugar and spices and turning, tossing or string a couple of times throughout the brining process helps distribute the flavors.

Refrigeration is required during brining.  The meat and brine should be kept below 40 degrees at all times.  The main problem logistically that people have when brining a whole bird is that you need a container large enough to submerge it completely within the brine.  I use a large stainless steel pot that I have from one of those out-door deep fryers (that we’ve never used for deep frying) and fortunately for me it is winter in Minnesota, so keeping it in cold the garage with cold packs is not a problem at all.  (If brining something large in the summer, I recommend using a large clean cooler!)

You’ll never want to eat turkey prepared with your old methods again as this is so moist and delicious!

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Ingredients:

Whole Turkey (ours was 20 lbs.)
Brine

Brine:
1 Cup Kosher Salt
1 Cup Salt
1 Cup Sugar
1 Gallon Water, plus more if needed
2 Carrots, chopped
1 Medium Onion, chopped
2 Ribs Celery, chopped
2 Tablespoons Black Peppercorns, whole

If the turkey is frozen, thaw it completely according to the package directions before brining.

Remove the giblets and neck from within the cavity.  (Save in the refrigerator for making gravy)  Trim away any large areas of fat or excess skin.  (I leave the tail on until baking, because the bird comes with a plastic piece on the tail end that makes it easier to hold and “bob” around for “stirring” within the brine)  

To make the brine combine all of the ingredients and stir until all of the sugar and water is dissolved.  Add chopped vegetables and pepper.  Rinse the bird thoroughly inside and out before adding it to the brine inside of the pot.  Submerge the bird in the brine and refrigerate for at least 24 hours, stirring occasionally.

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After the allotted time, remove the turkey and discard the brine liquid.  I use the vegetables to stuff the inside of the cavity of the turkey for flavor during baking.  Rinse off  turkey completely inside and out with cold water, pat dry; season and bake according to your favorite method. (I choose roasting bags.)

If serving turkey sliced, I like to let it sit in some homemade chicken stock that has been infused with some “better than bouillon” chicken or turkey flavor.

Enjoy!

Cheers!
~Chris

 

 

 

 

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