Chris' Recipes

Bon Appetite!

Canning Tomatoes

Written By: Chris - Sep• 12•17

I received these Roma tomatoes free from my friend Ginny who simply didn’t have time to can this year.  The original batch was very large and had blight, which is a disease caused by a fungus-like organism that spreads rapidly in the foliage and tubers or fruit of potatoes and tomatoes in wet weather, causing collapse and decay.  After some research, I discovered that the tomatoes are safe to eat with a little bit of attention and the removal of the dark, leathery areas.  I simply pureed the good parts of the cut tomatoes, including their skin and canned about eight quarts.  Both green and ripe tomatoes can be affected, so I discarded any of them that I had doubt and allowed the clean green tomatoes to ripen for about another week.  I like the Roma variety for canning because they are meatier than some of the other tomato varieties.

 

These are canning directions for the water-bath method. Raw packed, petite diced with no water added.

Ingredients:
Roma tomatoes
Lemon Juice or Citric Acid

Start by washing and your jars in hot soapy water and rinse them well.

 

Meanwhile, boil a pot of water for blanching.  I also like to get the canning pot of water prepared by bringing it to a boil before turning it off and covering it off for quick reheating later when needed.

Start with clean tomatoes.

I make an “X” on the narrow end of the tomatoes.  These tomatoes were about the size of a large egg, so I blanched six to eight at a time.  Along with your blanching pot of water, set up another bowl of cold water adjacent to it.  Also, add a third bowl to place the unpeeled tomatoes in, as well as a fourth bowl that you will place the peeled tomatoes in for later cutting.  I suggest having a trash or compost handy to work over.

Choose mesh strainer with a handle if you have one, or you could always use a large slotted spoon. Place some tomatoes onto the strainer before dipping them into boiling water for 30-60 seconds or so. “Hey Siri” came in handy for me because as the tomatoes boiled, I continued to make “X’s” in the upcoming ones that were to be boiled.

Once the timer goes off or you see the skins splitting, scoop them out and place them directly into the bowl of the cold water bath to stop the cooking.  Swirl them around in the cold water for a few seconds and place them into another bowl for skin removal.

You should be able to slip the skins off easily with your fingers and a pairing knife. I also like to cut out the small root end at the same time and discard the skins.  Once the skins are off, place them in the last bowl until you have peeled all of the tomatoes.

I continued to work in batches scoring the tomatoes while the others were in the hot boiling water and the entire process took about an hour.

Once you have removed all of the skins you may choose to leave the tomatoes whole, half them, or dice them, however you prefer. I like the petitte diced cut but this too takes time.  About another half an hour.

You will want to heat your jars before filling them so that they can hold up to the hot temperatures in the canning pot. You can do this by either by pulling them from a hot cycle of your dishwasher or by placing them in a sink of hot water to heat the glass.

 

Since you are canning tomatoes in a water bath canner, add either a teaspoon of Citric Acid or bottled lemon per pint or two teaspoons per quart. This is also a good time to heat the lids to the jar. Place lids in a sauce pan, and fill with water to cover them. Heat water to 180 degrees, but do not boil them. Turn the heat off and keep the lids heated until you are ready to use them.

These are raw packed tomatoes in their own juice, so stir them up before filling the jars leaving about 1/2 inch of headspace of room in each jar. Do not add water to your jars.

If you have spilled, wipe the rims of your jars clean before placing the hot lids on them as bits of food can interfere with the sealing process.  Process the jars according to Water bath instructions.

I placed the filled pint jars into my large, shallow church pot, brought the water level up to just below the screw on rings, and returned the water to a boil. I processed the jars by boiling them for thirty minutes.

Use a canning tongs to remove the jars from the hot water and place on a cooling mat.  Make sure that as they cool, the lids all seal.  You can do this by pressing the middle of the lid with a finger or thumb. If the lid does not spring back up when you release your finger, the lid is sealed.

 

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