Chris' Recipes

Bon Appetite!

Dilly Green Beans

Written By: Chris - Oct• 07•13

So a few weeks ago, my friend Jen offered me a bunch of fresh green beans and all of the fixings to make Dilly beans (pickled green beans).  She had run out of time before travels and didn’t want them to go to waste.  I’m adventurous and though I have not made dilly green beans before, I do enjoy canning projects and I love the little tart treats in bloody mary’s or bloody beers!  They are delicious for relish trays, or on their own, straight out of the jar.  It’s a project and these took me about five hours from start to finish.

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Ingredients: 

2-3 lbs. Fresh Green Beans, I had 6 Gallon sized bags
I Head of Fresh Dill, per jar
1/4 Cup Canning Salt
2 Cups Water
2 Cups White Vinegar
4 to 6 Garlic Cloves, per jar
4 to 6 Hot Thai Dragon Peppers, per jar
Habanero Peppers, if desired
2 Tablespoons Pickling Spice, per jar

I hadn’t a clue how many jars that I was going to make.  I multiplied my recipe as I had heard that it takes about 1/2 lb of green beans to fill a pint jar and I was using quart jars.  Start by washing all of the jars and rings in hot, soapy water or run them through the dishwasher.

Pour the green beans into a large bowl (or a clean kitchen sink) and soak in cool water, swishing them about to dislodge any dirt, leaves, etc.

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Using a pairing knife, snap the green bean ends and remove strings as necessary.  Discard any discolored, soft, or over sized tough beans.  Many of the beans I had were pretty large, so I blanched all of them; this is not necessary if you have smaller, tender beans.

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Place a large pot of water on the stove to boil (at least twice as much water by volume as the amount of beans you want to blanch).  When the water is boiling, add a large handful of beans and let them boil for one minute.  Remove the beans with a large slotted spoon, or a wire skimmer.  Immediately shock the beans in a bowl (or clean sink) of ice water (this stops the cooking and preserves the bright green color).

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Pack each quart jar with garlic, dill, peppers and pickle seasoning.

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I did a few with HOT Habanero peppers because I had them.

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Pack beans into jars tightly, but without crushing them.  Intermix small, curly beans with larger ones.  They will naturally fit differently than the long, straight ones but each will pickle well.

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Jen also gave me some huge cucumbers, so I seeded them and peeled them partially, chopped and pickled them as well.  I’ve read you can do all sorts of vegetables including Brussels sprouts, carrots, etc.

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For the solution, mix vinegar, water and canning salt and bring to a boil.  (My solution was based off of 16 Cups of vinegar + for about 20 quarts)

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Place lids into a small pan bring water to scalding in a slow simmer.  Don’t boil them and leave them in the water until you use them.

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Wear mitts and ladle or pour the hot solution over the beans, leaving about 1/4-inch of headspace in each jar.  Put lids on and screw the rings fairly tightly.

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Bring a large pot of water to boiling before placing your jars into it.  Fill waterbath canner pan with water to cover filled jars by one inch.  They will slow the boil, but cover the pan and once boiling hard again process the jars for 10 to 15 minutes.  Remove from boiling water using a jar lifter.

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Place on a towel or cooling mat.  Allow to cool and check each seal.  Refrigerate or re-process any jars that did not seal.  (To check seals press in center of lid; if it pops back, it’s not sealed.)

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I’ve been told to allow them to stand for three weeks before eating.  We dug into some after about two weeks and they were terrific!

Enjoy!

Cheers!
~Chris

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One Comment

  1. Jen says:

    Yummy! Thanks for sharing.

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