Chris' Recipes

Bon Appetite!

Pork Spare Ribs

Written By: Chris - Apr• 08•15

Spare ribs (also side ribs or spareribs) are a variety of pork ribs or beef ribs, cooked and eaten in various cuisines around the world.  They are the most inexpensive cut of pork and beef ribs; and my family loves either type. They are a long cut from the lower portion of the pig or cattle, specifically the belly and breastbone, behind the shoulder. There is a covering of meat on top of the bones as well as between them.  I prefer to cut the spare ribs and cook them roasted individually with a dry rub instead of a sauce.

In optimum weather months ribs prepared on the grill or smoker are terrific, but slow roasting them in the oven produces just as tender and succulent ribs too.  Go with a zesty spice blend dry rub on your ribs and you’ll swear they came from a backyard BBQ pit.  Cook them low and slow and they will be super tender and succulent!

IMG_5207

Ingredients: 

Pork Spare Ribs

Dry Rub:
1/3 Cup Brown Sugar
2 Tablespoons Onion Powder
2 Tablespoons Paprika
1 Tablespoon Chili Powder
1 Tablespoon Garlic granulated
1 Tablespoon Oregano
1 Tablespoon Parsley
1 teaspoon Cayenne
1 teaspoon Cumin
Salt & Pepper, to taste

IMG_5192

If you are cooking the ribs for a long time, some say that removing the membrane is unnecessary; but I usually do anyways.  Then cut the ribs and coat them evenly with the dry rub.

IMG_5195

If I’m going to slow cook the ribs indoors, I like to first broil them to create a browned, caramelized crunchy coat on the outside.  Put some water in the bottom of the broiling pan and spray the roasting rack well with non stick spray.  Position the ribs in a single layer to fill the pan and place them high enough in the center of the oven to broil for a few minutes on each side.  Once broiled, lower the heat in the oven to 275° and cover the ribs with foil.  Bake in the middle of the oven and rotate the pan from time to time.  The ribs will steam themselves and sizzle gently as they cook, and they’ll become tender after about two to three hours.  You can test for doneness by pulling on the meat with tongs.  If the meat between the ribs is still tough, keep cooking and checking on them every 15 minutes or so while continuing to rotate the pan.

IMG_5196

Serve with or without sauce.

Enjoy!
Cheers!
~Chris

 

Comments

comments

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

What do you think?