Chris' Recipes

Bon Appetite!

Seafood Pot Pie

Written By: Chris - Dec• 14•17

I was recently hosting friends for dinner and wanted to prepare something special.  I was inspired to make a dish with a puffed pastry top while watching one of the chefs that appeared on the Food Network shows “Chopped”.  A pot pie is a type of meat pie with stew that is topped with crust consisting of flaky pastry.

Since I had some homemade fish stock, fresh jumbo shrimp and scallops on hand in the freezer, I decided against the traditional chicken type and headed to Costco to pick up some lobster to make this dish more succulent!  I picked up Langostino (little lobster as the Spanish name suggests), which are harvested year round off the Chilean coastlines.  Rich with nutrients such as selenium, protein, potassium, iodine and calcium, they have a meaty texture and rose pink flesh that has a deliciously sweet taste, similar to that of lobster or shrimp and can be used as the perfect substitute in any dish.  These tails are sold pre-cooked and peeled.  I also found Lobster Claws that were also fully cooked, scoreed and ready to enjoy.

I watched an online video of Ina Garten and added some ingredients to make this dish my own.  There are a few methods noted within that I would suggest differently as well.

Ingredients:
1 stick Butter, unsalted 
1 Yellow Onion, large, chopped
2 Garlic Cloves, pressed
2 Carrots, peeled, sliced thin on a mandolin 
1/2 Cup Wonder Flour (or all-purpose Flour)
4 Cups Fish Stock (I used homemade from Mussels, but you could use clam juice)
2/3 Cup White Wine, I used Chennin Blanc from Wandering Cellars
2 Shrimp, Large – per person peeled and deveined
2 Sea Scallops, per person sliced in three horizontally because they were large
12-14 Langostino, per person
1 Lobster Claw, per person cooked with meat removed and main claw set aside
4 Tablespoons of Old Bay Seasoning
4-6 Tablespoons Heavy Cream
1 1/2 Cups Peas, frozen
2 Cups Whole Onions, small frozen
1/2 cup Flat-leaf Parsley, chopped
Salt & freshly ground Black Pepper, to taste

 

Thaw the Langostino and Lobster claws and remove the lobster from it’s shell.  Rinse well and set aside.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Start by melting the butter in a large pan over medium heat.  Add the chopped onion and carrots and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, until the onions are translucent.  Add the garlic and cook for another minute or two.

Next add flour and cook over low heat for about two minutes, stirring occasionally.

When the flour is cooked in the onion and carrot mixture, slowly add the wine and stir constantly until the flour is absorbed.

bring the stock to a simmer in a small saucepan.  I followed Ina’s instructions to add the shrimp and scallops and cook for two minutes, just until firm but next time I wouldn’t bother cooking the shrimp at all because I felt they were overcooked in the finished dish.  

 

Remove the seafood to a large bowl with a slotted spoon, reserving the stock.

 

Stirring constantly, add the reserved stock into the onion, carrot, and wine.  Add the frozen peas and frozen onions.

Simmer for about five minutes before stirring in the heavy cream.

I wanted to make sure each of the portions had the same amount of shellfish, so I divided up the scallops, shrimp, Langostino, and lobster meat (but not the main claw) into individual baking dishes.

Add the Old Bay seasoning, salt & pepper to the stew to taste and stir in chopped parsley.

Pour the mixture over the seafood and stir each dish gently.  Bake uncovered for about 20 to 40 minutes until bubbling hot.

I tossed the large claws with heated butter on the ovens top and then added one per dish for the last 10 minutes of baking just to heat through.

For this dish I decided to top my fillings with a piece of raw pastry and cooked for nearly an hour.  Next time I would definitely cook the tops separately as they didn’t puff up as I desired. 

After looking at some helpful hints on puffpastry.com, I learned that it’s important to always preheat your oven to 425° for a minimum of 15-20 minutes before baking, because Puff Pastry depends on even heat to rise and puff.  You then lower the heat and place the pastries one inch apart.  Then top each baking dish of stew with cooked puffed pastry.

Enjoy!
Cheers,
Chris

 

 

 

 

 

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