Chris' Recipes

Bon Appetite!

Salsa, 2013

Written By: Chris - Oct• 15•13

I almost never write down exactly what I do for salsa and I admit that my recipe has changed year to year!  I typically look on line and see what is in other recipes and wing it based on what I have on hand in my fridge and pantry and tweak it as I go by taste.  This year I got a lot of tomatoes for a very reasonable price from my friend Heather.  She called from a local farm and I decided on four bushels.  (The tubs were larger than I expected.)

I decided to document so I could share on the blog.  You’ll find a basic recipe for salsa below.  Once your salsa is complete, you have the ability to mix multiple batches of unique flavors as you wish!  I made some mild, some medium, hot, (though I don’t think mine is very hot this year) some with mango and others with corn and some with chipoltle.  You can mix in pineapple, or mango and create whatever you like!

To be honest, this was a bit much as I had way too many tomatoes ending up with 176 jars.  Including the cost of the added jars and the additional ingredients, each jar equated to about $1.25 a jar regardless of size.  If you don’t mind investing the time, it’s pretty reasonable, but next years batch will be smaller!

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I made TEN times this batch:

Ingredients:

Roughly 24 Cups  peeled and cored tomatoes (I keep the seeds and these ones were juicy.  All sizes and types)
1 Large Green Pepper, chopped
1 Large Red Pepper, chopped
2/3 Cup Onion, chopped
1 Large Jalapeno (or more, chopped)
2 Tablespoons Canned chopped Chilies
1 Cup Apple Cider Vinegar (necessary for cooked, canned)
1 Tablespoon Oregano
2 Tablespoons salt & pepper each
4 Large Garlic Cloves, pressed
¼ Cup Sugar (to taste)
1 large Lime, zest and juice
1/3 Cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
LOTS of Cilantro

IMG_0428 tomatoe bin

Prewash all of your jars and rings by running them through the dishwasher

jars2

Wash, score and blanch the tomatoes in order to peel them easier.  To blanch tomatoes, boil a pot of water and put another bowl of ice water near to it.  To prepare the tomato, remove the stock, or stem, at the top of the tomato with your knife. Then slice an “X” in the bottom of the tomato.

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Submerge the tomato(s) in the boiling water and allow them to sit for up to two minutes. (I think less could be better to avoid absorbing too much water, but skins may not remove easily)  Remove the tomatoes with a slotted spoon or wire scoop.   Plunge the tomatoes in the ice water and leave them there for a few seconds (or until you’re ready to peel them) Using a sharp knife or your nail, peel away the skin and try not to cut the tomato flesh.

peeling

Monica did a lot of the blanching and I did a lot of the peeling!  Michelle helped quite a bit too and her fingers were stained red!

mon & Chris

We had ten bowls going.

tomatoes bowlof peeled

Recruit as much help as you can!!

onions IMG_0436

Chop the onions in the food processor and add to batches.

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Bell peppers, hot peppers and other vegetables all need to be chopped.

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Morgan was chopping bell peppers, while Michelle was peeling bulbs of garlic.

garlic IMG_0445

Use the food processor for fine chopping and add vegetables to the batches.

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Morgan was in charge of the limes, zesting and adding the juice to each batch!

limes

Jacob and Bill stirred as all of the spices and chopped cilantro was added.

IMG_0439 bowls

We typically use a cooking method.  Some years we hand chop everything, but this year we started by using an immersion blender to puree it.

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We found that this was very soupy and opted to leave half of the batches uncooked and did not puree them.  We just chopped and smashed the tomatoes and mixed the cooked and uncooked salsa.

Mix some of the batches with flavors that you like.  This years salsa seemed a bit sweeter, so sugar can be less.  I had some corn salad left over that I mixed in to some.  I also made some chipotle batches.  We added additional peppers to make some hot.

Taste as you go.  I used dry herbs because it’s what I had and I prefer less Oregano.

Pour into jars and seal by canning.

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Place lids into a small pan bring water to scalding in a slow simmer.  Don’t boil them and leave them in the water until you use them.  Put lids on and screw the rings fairly tightly.  Bring a large pot of water to boiling before placing your jars into it.  Fill water bath canner pan with water to cover filled jars by one inch.  They will slow the boil, but cover the pan and once boiling hard again process the jars for 10 to 15 minutes.  Remove from boiling water using a jar lifter.  Place on a towel or cooling mat.

Allow to cool and check each seal.  Refrigerate or re-process any jars that did not seal.  (To check seals press in center of lid; if it pops back, it’s not sealed.)   

Enjoy!

Cheers!
~Chris

 

 

 

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  1. […] Rick keeps a notebook of all of his recipes.  He was kind enough to share a couple of last years batches recipes that we compared.  Here is a link to my previous large batch of Salsa in 2013. […]

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